Kubrick and the power of spontaneity in the creative process

We all know and love Kubrick for his masterful use of photography, and for his innate knowledge of the medium which lead him to becoming one of the 20th century’s greatest film auteurs – but what is less well known; is that he also understood the power of spontaneity in the creative process. One of the many misconceptions about creative people is that they ‘create’ things out of nowhere – more often than not, it is a gift for combining things that seem unrelated and have the bravery to explore and edit results. As with all gifted creative people, Kubrick allowed for, and understood the power of serendipity. One such ‘happy accident’ turned into one of the greatest marriages of celluloid and music in move-making history. While editing the space docking sequence for his seminal film 2001: A Space Odyssey, Kubrick was using the now famous music track – R.Strauss’s ‘The Blue Danube’ – only as a ‘guide’ for editing purposes. It was only meant to be temporary; planning to have an original score written at a later date. Something seemingly temporary became an indelible moment in cinema history. For more from the master move-maker, please click on the link below for a rare interview with Stanley Kubrick recorded in 1966. https://soundcloud.com/brainpicker/a-rare-interview-with-stanley

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