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William Mortensen, “Flying Witch (Myrdith)” (ca. 1930), vintage silver print

William Mortensen, “Flying Witch (Myrdith)” (ca. 1930), vintage silver print

Link to exhibition details: http://hyperallergic.com/157037/william-mortensen/

To celebrate Halloween: The most bonkers and controversial of the early pioneers of photography. William Mortensen. Thanks to Thierry van Biesen for reminding me of the past master and his ghoulish and grotesque work. Happy Halloween y’all.

 

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang © Sean Hayes

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang © Sean Hayes

The Bay © Sean Hayes

The Bay © Sean Hayes

Da Brudder © Sean Hayes

Da Brudder © Sean Hayes

The Meeting © Sean Hayes

The Meeting © Sean Hayes

More images at http://seanmobilephotos.tumblr.com

Nice post from friend and fellow art director David Milligan-Croft.
I’m a big fan of Desiree Dolron and Nadav Kander’s work in particular.

http://www.desireedolron.com/-/series/1/1

http://nadavkander.com

Thereisnocavalry

My goodness, where to begin?

There are so many brilliant photographers that I could probably fill all 365 things to be grateful for with them alone.

I’ve had the privilege of working with some outstanding photographers during my 30 long years in the ad industry. Most of whom were artists in their own right. I’m not going to feature them here just in case I forget someone and invoke their ire.

Instead, I’m going to show some of the photographers whose work has inspired me over the years. Certainly not an exhaustive list. Hope you like them. Feel free to make your own suggestion.

We could argue the toss as to what makes a great photograph – composition, light, concept. But what I feel a great photo should do is tell a story or ask questions of the viewer.

Ansel Adams Ansel Adams

Eve Arnold Eve Arnold

Richard Avedon Richard Avedon

Diane Arbus Diane Arbus

Cecile Beaton Cecil Beaton

Brassai Brassai

View original post 35 more words

My friend Martin Müller-Römheld passed away last Sunday. We had recently been discussing a list of books that had made an impression on our lives. On Martin’s list was the book “Steppenwolf” by the Swiss German author Hermann Hesse. I have selected a passage from the book that I believe pays homage to the man and his life. The accompanying series of photographs I shot recently complement the text perfectly.

“My resolve to die was not the whim of an hour. It was the ripe, sound fruit that had slowly grown to full size, lightly rocked by the winds of fate whose next breath would bring it to the ground. ”

Rest in peace my friend.

Steppenwolf © Sean Hayes

Steppenwolf © Sean Hayes

Steppenwolf © Sean Hayes

Steppenwolf © Sean Hayes

Steppenwolf © Sean Hayes

Steppenwolf © Sean Hayes

Useful Photography is a magazine focusing on overlooked images taken for practical purposes. In the eleventh edition, it takes aim at the surprising variety of shooting targets available.

This history of human targets in photo form has been collected from shooting ranges that scatter the United States of America in their tens of thousands. The series covers recent times as well as past decades, and portrays the changing state of a nation, one increasingly held ransom by gun crime but seemingly powerless to change the way firearms are viewed and used.

With the 2nd amendment stating the right to keep and bear arms, up to 55 million households take this to heart and holster by having at least one firearm in their possession.

Target practice in the US and this collection takes many forms. From masked intruders to terrorist invaders; from hostage situations to anatomy targets; from Osama Bin Laden brandishing a rifle to law enforcement officers brandishing a badge; from bombers to rottweilers. Find your favourite to force you to shoot and think.

Throughout the series, Useful Photography #11 asks the question: in this age of high impact gun crime, are the participants seeking protection or accelerating the violence?

— Erik Kessels

Link: https://www.lensculture.com/articles/erik-kessels-useful-photography-011

via LensCulture – Contemporary Photography.

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