25 Incredible Band Photos That Will Restore Your Faith In Good Music | So Bad So Good

Rock ‘n’ Roll and photography are made for each other. My early visual education was informed and inspired by music photography commissioned by the NME – a British music journalism magazine that had its heyday during the emerging punk period in the late 70s. Along with incisive and intelligent writing from Julie Burchill and Tony Parson’s, the magazine also hired “hip young gunslingers” to take the photos. Photographers like Anton Corbijn and Pennie Smith, who shot the famous photo of The Clash’s Paul Simonon smashing his guitar on stage. Smith’s iconic photo went on to appear as the cover album art for The Clash’s seminal “London Calling”. Rumour has it that the NME is on its last legs. A “victim” of the irrepressible digital onslaught? I think not. Like many creative endeavours today, we’ve all forgotten what makes something interesting, something compelling. NME will probably crash and burn as a result of pandering to market research “experts”. Like politicians who have nothing to say, creative people are also asking the market what they want to see and hear. All we want is to hear and look at is something that has soul. A point of view that challenges how we perceive things. Something that isn’t boring. Too much to ask?

Link: 25 Incredible Band Photos That Will Restore Your Faith In Good Music | So Bad So Good.

3 comments

    • Sean Hayes

      Hi Jean. Interesting read. I’ve worked as an advertising art director for over 30 years and have observed and experienced first-hand the fluctuating dynamics of creative “partnerships” – the good, the bad and the ugly. Sometimes, but not always, a creative tension through teaming up is the best way to achieve breakthrough results. It obviously worked for Lennon and McCarthy. But more often than not, both parties become extremely fatigued after a certain period of time and go their separate ways. Staying in the music genre – the Gallagher brothers from Oasis jump to mind as an example of intense creativity followed by a falling out and recriminations all round (allegedly:). It is a minor miracle that Jagger and Richards can still work with each other. I think the best creative partnerships are anima/animus constructs – a mirror relationship that walks a delicate tightrope of extreme fascination and respect for their opposite number – but where both egos are terrified of being subsumed by the other and can self-destruct at any time. It also leads to work that can seem miraculous – as is then case with the Beatles music.

      Liked by 1 person

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