Category: Contemporary Photographers

Delighted to have received 3 Honourable mentions at the Mobile Photography Awards 2016

Capturing the human spirit. Photography by Christian Peacock. 

American photographer Christian Peacock has restored my faith in photography. Digital has reduced the human spirit to a polarised code – you are nothing but a combination of zeros and ones. Not true. Christian shot these beautiful creamy portraits with film. Old school with a touch of the old masters’ aesthetic. The people in these photographs exist. They breathe. They have lives. They have loves. They have triumphs and disasters. They are human. Humanity captured gracefully by a very talented photographer. In my book, old school is doing something real well; with spirit and passion. Christian should be proud of his old school credentials. Please check out his “Making of” blog and learn how analog photography changes the relationship between shooter and subject – the secret sauce that digital has all but forgotten.  Source: Blog — Christian Peacock Photography

Amazing how focal length affect shape of the face – Dan Vojtěch BLOG

Camera never lies? Then change your lens;)

Its always difficult to answer what is the best focal length for a portrait. Here is small preview how different focal lengths can change look of a face. Share this:ShareShare on FacebookClick to share on TwitterClick to share on LinkedIn

Source: Amazing how focal length affect shape of the face – Dan Vojtěch BLOG

Feeling honoured to be among the Honourable Mentions at IPPAWARDS 2016

It’s Nice That | Daragh Soden’s thoughtful portraits of young Dubliners

Photography as Time Machine.

I named my blog ‘Time Machine’ for a reason – a camera not only freezes a moment in time but can also explore the space-time continuum within a two-dimensional still photograph. Photographer Stephen Wilkes crafts stunning compositions of landscapes as they transition from day to night.

Link to original article:

http://www.ted.com/talks/stephen_wilkes_the_passing_of_time_caught_in_a_single_photo

Film vs Digital – Doubt vs Certainty.

 

British artist Tacita Dean alludes to a quality about film that we have all but forgotten in our digitised world, namely, the artistic necessity of gestation. The immediacy that digital affords the creative process has diminished the value of an ‘interval of time’ between start and finish; where mistakes can be made, flaws are seen and incorporated, and the chemistry allowed to surprise. Digital crushes time by being efficient and economical. Digital leaves nothing to chance by banishing the ‘not knowing’ part of creativity that’s an essential ingredient of image making. Our so-called modern world demands clarity, conviction, conciseness, confidence and cost control – digital delivers all these digital left brain qualities. Ambiguity and doubt are the domain of the analog right brain – and that is where interesting things are made. Nuance.

 

“There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept.” Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams’ famous quote about technical proficiency in photography is more apt today than ever. Camera manufactures and photography ‘gearheads’ continue to peddle a narrow narrative concerning the importance of mathematically machined photographic equipment and its importance if you want to ‘shoot like a pro’. British photographer Pennie Smith has proven otherwise. Her iconic photo of Paul Simonon smashing his guitar on stage during a show in New York City in 1979 is a perfect example of the visceral power of an imperfect photograph that is perfectly flawed. It’s out of focus and grainy. A technocrats worst nightmare. Yet it became one of the most famous images in Rock’n’Roll when used as cover art for The Clash’s London Calling album. A fuzzy photo that captures the energy and vitality of life will always win out against a sterile photo that’s perfectly sharp.

pennie_smith_the-clash1

London Calling Album Cover © Pennie Smith

Interview with Pennie Smith via Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/showstudio-official/showstudio-punk-photography-4

Nadav Kander shoots simple but powerful new Samaritans campaign – Creative Review

I’ve always admired the work of Nadav Kander. The simple elegance  of his advertising and editorial photography belies the consideration and intelligence he puts into creating some of the most compelling images in photography today. Couple his renowned photographic skills with equally considered and intelligent advertising copywriting and art direction and something interesting – and increasingly rare – happens: Your advertising gets noticed. Result. Simples. To quote recently retired adman Bob Hoffman of http://adcontrarian.blogspot.be fame; “Creative people make the ads. Everyone else makes the arrangements.”

Link to Kander’s site: http://www.nadavkander.com

Source: Nadav Kander shoots simple but powerful new Samaritans campaign – Creative Review

Photographers and their eureka moments – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

As photographers, we all strive to take photographs that make people sit up and take notice. Here are the shots and stories that did just that.

The exhibition The Shot That Made Me sees photographers pinpoint the breakthrough shots in their careers – whether they’re of ballet, Malala or Branson

Source: Photographers and their eureka moments – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian