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Over 30 years of working in advertising has thought me one thing. Everyone listens to their prejudices to the detriment of a possibly mythic ‘objective reality’. It’s only human. Imagine a world where everybody has the same thoughts and saw everybody and everything the same way. What a boring world that would be. Here’s to mythic misunderstanding and the humour it brings.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-TyPfYMDK8

Click here to watch this video and write a comment

Source: 6 Different Photographers Were Told To Shoot The Same Man. The End Result Shocked Everyone | Dumpest

Another copy right or wrong debate. This time the debate is about your right to share your favourite city travel snaps on social media. It’s called the ‘freedom of panorama’  and it grants you the unrestricted permission to use photos of cityscapes without infringing the rights of the architect or designer. Now, a new European directive could take away that right. Read on. And please do share your thoughts in the comments section.

Link to article: If you want to keep sharing photos for free, read this | Jimmy Wales | Comment is free | The Guardian.

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Nothing new under the sun. Thanks to Kelvin Hudson for original post.

Link to a talented photographer’s site: http://www.kelvinhudson.com

Love this little gem of a film from Boston-born, Amsterdam-based Director, SG Collins. In a little over 13 minutes, the film covers everything I’m interested in – NASA, the Apollo program, Kubrick, photography, cinematography – and why people believe their own bullshit. A viewing was recommended by my good friend Lisa Chase (thank you for bringing this to my attention Lisa x). If you’re interested in other projects by Collins, please check out his YouTube channel. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc_7Ma93pG8KTZOr_cw002w

Nowadays, everybody is a photographer – even octopuses are getting in on the act.

Link: Holy Crap, This Octopus is Taking Pictures of Its Visitors.

I’m a person who has always been interested in interesting people who say or make interesting things. Advertising used to be melting pot of these kind of people. Not so much anymore. I believe the art of short film making is where all the interesting stuff is being conceived and beaten into shape on laptops all around the world – sometimes on a shoestring budget. Historically, the price of producing slick audio-visual projects were prohibitively expensive and only the most dedicated – or maddest, pick your superlative – had the endurance to bring their visions to fruition. Today, thanks to affordable technology, the price of entry to this once exclusive club has dropped to almost zero. The only investment required is a belief in your own ability to make interesting things. That’s the good news. The bad news is you have to make or say something very, very, very interesting to break through the tsunami of sameness that infests our creative culture today. These films, I believe, are a good representation of what can be achieved creatively if one sets out with a good idea to start with – something that resonates with us as empathetic human beings. The film “Reach” by Luke Randall is a good example of storytelling that pulls on heart strings as well as electronic cables. Many people believe that technology is changing us and that we must keep up with technological change if we want to stay relevant. Rubbish. Our human responses to authenticity has always been the same – for countless generations. These films are authentic. That’s why they work so well. Artifice can only get you so far. Creativity about is building things that ring true. Short films used to be a “calling card” while prospecting for bigger projects. I believe they are now a standalone art form in and of themselves. Hope you agree. Enjoy.

TED Blog

Watching more than seventy live, perspective-changing TED Talks back to back for five days straight is nothing to scoff at. Let’s be honest: Your brain gets tired. That’s why TED’s curators program each session with short video breaks to give the mind a rest before the next set of talks. Funny, inspiring, silly, beautiful, here’s all the videos shown this year at the conference. Think of it as TED’s short film festival.

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Pinnipèdes
, by Victor Caire. Two fat, sleepy animated seals fight and love each other.

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Wiggly Things
, by Rogier van der Zwaag. An animated interpretation of philosopher Alan Watts’ lectures, about how we humans like to “break down the wiggliness of the world.”

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Reach
, by Luke Randall. A robot that needs to be plugged in in order to survive dreams of life outside his window.

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Moving images
, by Lorne Resnick. Lorne Resnick makes five-second video clips…

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Happy New Year y’all. Keep smiling and taking great photographs.

Thomas Vanden Driessche – How to Be…A Photographer in Four Lessons | LensCulture.

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