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Someone, somewhere stated that “Good is the enemy of great”. I’ve been fiddling with my new website for weeks trying to make peace between the two. A truce was called. Time to launch myself into my “second life”. Being an advertising art director for the last 25 years has been incredibly rewarding for me – but my real passion now is photography. When you are passionate about doing something,  you tend to do it well, and it shows in the work. Hopefully, my passion for photography will, in time, shine through. If you get a moment, I would appreciate you visiting the site and rummaging around. Please feel free to suggest ideas and thoughts about the site and how I could make it better. Good enough may be the enemy of great, but the will to get better is your best weapon in the fight to do great work.

Link to site: http://seanhayesphotography.format.com

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New Photography Website.

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Delighted to be among the honourable mentions in the black & white category of this year’s annual Mobile Photography Awards. Some great work here. What I like about B&W photography is that it strips back an image to its essentials. Texture, tonal contrast, shape, form and lighting are the building blocks of a photograph. Get all these attributes singing along in harmony and you could possibly end up with a great photo. B&W is the acid test of a photographer to create picture perfect images. Congrats to the winner, David Ingraham, and fellow runner-ups, who pass the test perfectly. A big shout-out to MPA founder (and talented mobile photographer in his own right), Daniel Berman, for his commitment and energy to make the MPA the success it has rightfully become since its inception in 2011. Mobile photography, and the very active talented community that make it so vibrant, is still in its infancy. Baby steps are turning into giant strides. Congrats to all involved.

Link to winning work: http://mobilephotoawards.com/black-white-winner-honorable-mentions-mpa-2015/

Helter_Skelter_Sean_Hayes

Helter Skelter © Sean Hayes

I’m a person who has always been interested in interesting people who say or make interesting things. Advertising used to be melting pot of these kind of people. Not so much anymore. I believe the art of short film making is where all the interesting stuff is being conceived and beaten into shape on laptops all around the world – sometimes on a shoestring budget. Historically, the price of producing slick audio-visual projects were prohibitively expensive and only the most dedicated – or maddest, pick your superlative – had the endurance to bring their visions to fruition. Today, thanks to affordable technology, the price of entry to this once exclusive club has dropped to almost zero. The only investment required is a belief in your own ability to make interesting things. That’s the good news. The bad news is you have to make or say something very, very, very interesting to break through the tsunami of sameness that infests our creative culture today. These films, I believe, are a good representation of what can be achieved creatively if one sets out with a good idea to start with – something that resonates with us as empathetic human beings. The film “Reach” by Luke Randall is a good example of storytelling that pulls on heart strings as well as electronic cables. Many people believe that technology is changing us and that we must keep up with technological change if we want to stay relevant. Rubbish. Our human responses to authenticity has always been the same – for countless generations. These films are authentic. That’s why they work so well. Artifice can only get you so far. Creativity about is building things that ring true. Short films used to be a “calling card” while prospecting for bigger projects. I believe they are now a standalone art form in and of themselves. Hope you agree. Enjoy.

TED Blog

Watching more than seventy live, perspective-changing TED Talks back to back for five days straight is nothing to scoff at. Let’s be honest: Your brain gets tired. That’s why TED’s curators program each session with short video breaks to give the mind a rest before the next set of talks. Funny, inspiring, silly, beautiful, here’s all the videos shown this year at the conference. Think of it as TED’s short film festival.

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Pinnipèdes
, by Victor Caire. Two fat, sleepy animated seals fight and love each other.

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Wiggly Things
, by Rogier van der Zwaag. An animated interpretation of philosopher Alan Watts’ lectures, about how we humans like to “break down the wiggliness of the world.”

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Reach
, by Luke Randall. A robot that needs to be plugged in in order to survive dreams of life outside his window.

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Moving images
, by Lorne Resnick. Lorne Resnick makes five-second video clips…

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Now and again, I come across work that makes me stop and stare. And stare again. And get jealous. Brilliant work from Danila Tkachenko who has won first prize at the 2014 Lens Culture Exposure Awards with his series of images of decaying post-soviet weaponry called “Restricted Areas”. Maybe it’s the adman in me, but I love the conceptual simplicity of the photographs combined with an elegant execution. No trickery. Just metal, concrete and dead ideologies all drenched in an ethereal daylight bouncing off the snow. Almost like infinity studio work. Absolutely love the series. Congratulations to Danila. Damn. Where’s my camera? Great work inspires people.

Link: Danila Tkachenko – Restricted Areas | LensCulture. Web site: http://www.danilatkachenko.com

Restricted Areas © Danila Tkachenko

Restricted Areas © Danila Tkachenko

Nice post from fellow Irish mobile photographer, Brendan Ó Sé, on the nature of creative competition, and on how it can inspire artists to excel at what they do.

Photographic Punctuation

Last Wednesday, the results from the Mobile Photography Awards (MPAs) were announced. This was my second time entering the competition. Last year, I did not place. This year, I got two honourable mentions for the photographs below. This is a competition I really like. It is exceptionally well-organised and there is so much quality in the winning images and those which received honourable mentions. Mobile photography is innovative and has real momentum. There is a thriving mobile photography community and some extraordinary people driving it forward with passion. Daniel K. Berman, the founder of the Mobile Photography Awards, is one of these people. The MPAs, I believe are helping photographers to emerge and to gain recognition. And also, the competition is inspiring photographers to learn, to experiment, to innovate and to have fun.

Photography is a hobby for me. I remember reading something from Eric Kim (I tried to…

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Don’t forget – get your entries in before the 3 December. This world-renowned award competition has rapidly become the reference for the mobile photography fraternity. Quality prizes and judges.

Daniel Berman and the 2013 Mobile Photo Awards.

Sean Hayes Harvest

Harvest © Sean Hayes (2012)

It’s competition time again over at the annual Mobile Photography Awards. Going into its third year, the MPA is an international open call for photographs and images created on smartphones and tablets with a Grand Prize this year of 3,000 dollars. I was very pleased to have received an honorable mention in the Landscape Category last year for my image ‘Harvest’ and I will definitely be entering work this year. It is a very well organised event and I recommend that you should consider entering your mobile photographic work. For entry details please see the link below.

Link: 3rd Annual Mobile Photography Awards | The Mobile Photography Awards.

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