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Vfestival Series © Sean Hayes

Vfestival Series © Sean Hayes

I was invited by Virgin Media UK to be the Instagrammer for the Vfestival 2015; an annual music festival held in England during the last weekend in August. I was responsible for the ‘live feed’ of images documenting the festivities over a two day period. I was also supplied with a brilliant new smartphone camera by sponsor LG called the G4. These photographs are a selection of the images posted from the LGG4 direct to Virgin Media’s Instagram account. All images were shot in camera without further processing unless otherwise stated in the accompanying text. All photographs © Sean Hayes 2015. If you would like to see more of my mobile photography work from this festival, please visit: http://instavfestival.tumblr.com

Vfestival Series © Sean Hayes

Vfestival Series © Sean Hayes

Vfestival Series © Sean Hayes

Vfestival Series © Sean Hayes

This week I was working as an ‘extra’ on the Jonathan Barré film ‘La folle histoire de Max et Léon. Some of the filming is taking place in the Belgium city of Namur, and is the humorous story of two French orphans during WW2. As per usual, I decided to make a pest of myself in between takes and asked if I could photograph the portraits of some of the supporting cast and ‘extras’. Here are the results. I shot everything with the LGG4 smartphone using available light. I processed the images with the Snapseed and Picfx photo apps.

If you would like to see more of my mobile photography portraits, please visit : http://seanmobileportraits.tumblr.com

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

© Nettie Edwards

Life is but an illusion of permanency. Our consumer culture sells us the promise of health, wealth and happiness as not only being easily obtainable, but once acquired, will remain in our possession indefinitely. The passage of time proves otherwise, yet we still cling to the fantasy that perpetuity is inherent to certain things. Photography being a perfect example: A moment frozen in time. Something you can “own”. Forever.  The ethereal images of the British artist, Nettie Edwards, questions this assumption. Using an old photographic printing technique called ‘Anthotypes’, Nettie creates beautiful photos and prints of flowers and plants using light sensitive material from plants themselves. A beautiful conceptual construct that becomes even more compelling when we realise, just like plants themselves, they are fleeting – there is no known way to permanently fix the images. They give enormous joy and delight for a short period of time – and then they disappear. Analogous to life itself. Photography that truly represents the transitory nature of reality. Please visit Nettie’s blog to discover more of her work and fascinating print processes with plants. Link: ANTHOTYPES.

Ida. Cinematographer Lukasz Zal.

Ida. Cinematographer Lukasz Zal.

I’ve tagged this compelling post under the title of Cinematography, which is, admittedly, stretching the remit of my blog a bit, but an article from today’s British Guardian merits attention. Although two of the films mentioned – “Ida” and “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter… and Spring” – are beyond sublime cinematographically and deserve more than a mere footnote, the real reason I’ve reposted is to share the central premise of the article: Movies matter. We live in an age where most of our cultural gatekeepers have been demoted by a digital democracy championing an understanding that everything is now commodity: A sense that it doesn’t matter what you make so long as it satisfies a market need or want. This is unfortunate. The best movies, like the best art, usually come out of left field – uninvited and unexpected. The market is like a two-way mirror. The market is never surprised. It only observes. It consumes – never creates. Great movies, on the other hand, are always mirrors of who we are inside. The movies mentioned in the article are great movies. Worth a read. Link to article:  I watch therefore I am: seven movies that teach us key philosophy lessons | Film | The Guardian.

Rock ‘n’ Roll and photography are made for each other. My early visual education was informed and inspired by music photography commissioned by the NME – a British music journalism magazine that had its heyday during the emerging punk period in the late 70s. Along with incisive and intelligent writing from Julie Burchill and Tony Parson’s, the magazine also hired “hip young gunslingers” to take the photos. Photographers like Anton Corbijn and Pennie Smith, who shot the famous photo of The Clash’s Paul Simonon smashing his guitar on stage. Smith’s iconic photo went on to appear as the cover album art for The Clash’s seminal “London Calling”. Rumour has it that the NME is on its last legs. A “victim” of the irrepressible digital onslaught? I think not. Like many creative endeavours today, we’ve all forgotten what makes something interesting, something compelling. NME will probably crash and burn as a result of pandering to market research “experts”. Like politicians who have nothing to say, creative people are also asking the market what they want to see and hear. All we want is to hear and look at is something that has soul. A point of view that challenges how we perceive things. Something that isn’t boring. Too much to ask?

Link: 25 Incredible Band Photos That Will Restore Your Faith In Good Music | So Bad So Good.

 

Link : Sean Mobile Photos.

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