Tagged: cinematography

Sean Hayes’ Photography Portfolio – Cinemagraphs

Cinemagraphs are still photographs brought to “life”. The Dublin-based creative team of Trista Vincent and Declan Byrne have commissioned me to create a suite of images for their Car’n’Stuff campaign for Liberty Insurance Ireland. Lots of fun. More to come. Click on images to see the magic.    Source: Sean Hayes’s Photography Portfolio – Cinemagraphs

Amazing how focal length affect shape of the face – Dan Vojtěch BLOG

Camera never lies? Then change your lens;)

Its always difficult to answer what is the best focal length for a portrait. Here is small preview how different focal lengths can change look of a face. Share this:ShareShare on FacebookClick to share on TwitterClick to share on LinkedIn

Source: Amazing how focal length affect shape of the face – Dan Vojtěch BLOG

Film vs Digital – Doubt vs Certainty.

 

British artist Tacita Dean alludes to a quality about film that we have all but forgotten in our digitised world, namely, the artistic necessity of gestation. The immediacy that digital affords the creative process has diminished the value of an ‘interval of time’ between start and finish; where mistakes can be made, flaws are seen and incorporated, and the chemistry allowed to surprise. Digital crushes time by being efficient and economical. Digital leaves nothing to chance by banishing the ‘not knowing’ part of creativity that’s an essential ingredient of image making. Our so-called modern world demands clarity, conviction, conciseness, confidence and cost control – digital delivers all these digital left brain qualities. Ambiguity and doubt are the domain of the analog right brain – and that is where interesting things are made. Nuance.

 

Nadav Kander shoots simple but powerful new Samaritans campaign – Creative Review

I’ve always admired the work of Nadav Kander. The simple elegance  of his advertising and editorial photography belies the consideration and intelligence he puts into creating some of the most compelling images in photography today. Couple his renowned photographic skills with equally considered and intelligent advertising copywriting and art direction and something interesting – and increasingly rare – happens: Your advertising gets noticed. Result. Simples. To quote recently retired adman Bob Hoffman of http://adcontrarian.blogspot.be fame; “Creative people make the ads. Everyone else makes the arrangements.”

Link to Kander’s site: http://www.nadavkander.com

Source: Nadav Kander shoots simple but powerful new Samaritans campaign – Creative Review

Christopher Nolan: How to Direct Your First Feature Film

Wim Wenders: Painter, Filmmaker, Photographer – YouTube

The German filmmaker Wim Wenders is a master image maker and storyteller. I’ve been reviewing his work this week, especially his 1984 movie ‘Paris, Texas’, and have marvelled at his use of photography to give the movie its power by creating a profound sense of place. Most movies are about character development and narrative and how they intertwine to tell a story. It’s rare for movie directors (John Ford’s ‘Grapes of Wrath’ and Orson Welles’ ‘Touch of Evil’ are two other examples that jump to mind) to give a starring role to places and landscapes in which the story unfolds. In this short interview, Wenders draws reference to ‘time’ as a guiding principle in creating his films and photography. Something I can relate to, having named my blog ‘Time Machine’ since its inception. I also relate to Wender’s being a painter, filmmaker and photographer and understanding that one informs the other to great effect. I have always maintained that photographers and filmmakers should study fine art painting to develop a deep understanding of framing, composition and light. Well worth watching.

Movie Extra Portrait Series © Sean Hayes

This week I was working as an ‘extra’ on the Jonathan Barré film ‘La folle histoire de Max et Léon. Some of the filming is taking place in the Belgium city of Namur, and is the humorous story of two French orphans during WW2. As per usual, I decided to make a pest of myself in between takes and asked if I could photograph the portraits of some of the supporting cast and ‘extras’. Here are the results. I shot everything with the LGG4 smartphone using available light. I processed the images with the Snapseed and Picfx photo apps.

If you would like to see more of my mobile photography portraits, please visit : http://seanmobileportraits.tumblr.com

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Park Life. A short film by Sean Hayes.

Park Life. A park in a Brussels suburb. Peace and quiet? Is silence really that silent? I worked harder on perfecting the sound of this short film than the images. We Iive in a a media saturated world with a never-ending stream of information screaming for our attention. Nature’s whispers can be just as compelling. All we have to do is listen.

Why conspiracy theorists make crap photographers.

Love this little gem of a film from Boston-born, Amsterdam-based Director, SG Collins. In a little over 13 minutes, the film covers everything I’m interested in – NASA, the Apollo program, Kubrick, photography, cinematography – and why people believe their own bullshit. A viewing was recommended by my good friend Lisa Chase (thank you for bringing this to my attention Lisa x). If you’re interested in other projects by Collins, please check out his YouTube channel. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc_7Ma93pG8KTZOr_cw002w

I watch therefore I am: seven movies that teach us key philosophy lessons | Film | The Guardian

Ida. Cinematographer Lukasz Zal.

Ida. Cinematographer Lukasz Zal.

I’ve tagged this compelling post under the title of Cinematography, which is, admittedly, stretching the remit of my blog a bit, but an article from today’s British Guardian merits attention. Although two of the films mentioned – “Ida” and “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter… and Spring” – are beyond sublime cinematographically and deserve more than a mere footnote, the real reason I’ve reposted is to share the central premise of the article: Movies matter. We live in an age where most of our cultural gatekeepers have been demoted by a digital democracy championing an understanding that everything is now commodity: A sense that it doesn’t matter what you make so long as it satisfies a market need or want. This is unfortunate. The best movies, like the best art, usually come out of left field – uninvited and unexpected. The market is like a two-way mirror. The market is never surprised. It only observes. It consumes – never creates. Great movies, on the other hand, are always mirrors of who we are inside. The movies mentioned in the article are great movies. Worth a read. Link to article:  I watch therefore I am: seven movies that teach us key philosophy lessons | Film | The Guardian.