Tagged: creative

Man at work. On the set of Larcier Group Belgium photoshoot. Thx to Brussels creative ad agency Good Morning.

Hi-diddle-dee-dee. A photographer’s life for me.

Really enjoying my new profession as a photographer. Here is a quick selection of some of my favourite shots since taking the leap in June. Many thanks to the people who have also taken a leap of faith and hired me. You know who you are. Thank you. For more of my work, please visit http://seanhayesphotography.format.com

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Festival faces. Vfestival 2016. Hylands Park. Chelmsford. UK © Sean Hayes

 

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Maxi Jazz. Lead vocalist of British electronica band Faithless at the 2016 Vfestival, Hylands Park, Chelmsford, UK. Client: Roseanna Burns, Paul Stafford Virgin Media UK © Sean Hayes

 

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Ricky Wilson. Lead vocalist of English indie band Kaiser Chiefs at the 2016 Vfestival, Hylands Park, Chelmsford, UK. Client: Roseanna Burns, Paul Stafford Virgin Media UK © Sean Hayes

 

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Car’n’Stuff Campaign – “iPad Geek” Creative Team: Trista Vincent, Declan Byrne. Agency: RMG Dublin Client: Liberty Insurance Ireland © Sean Hayes

 

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Car’n’Stuff Campaign – “Guitarist” Creative Team: Trista Vincent, Declan Byrne. Agency: RMG Dublin Client: Liberty Insurance Ireland © Sean Hayes

 

Sean Hayes’ Photography Portfolio – Cinemagraphs

Cinemagraphs are still photographs brought to “life”. The Dublin-based creative team of Trista Vincent and Declan Byrne have commissioned me to create a suite of images for their Car’n’Stuff campaign for Liberty Insurance Ireland. Lots of fun. More to come. Click on images to see the magic.    Source: Sean Hayes’s Photography Portfolio – Cinemagraphs

Feeling honoured to be among the Honourable Mentions at IPPAWARDS 2016

Bowie by Duffy. A creative collaboration.

Chris Duffy, son of legendary fashion photographer Brian Duffy, guides us through the work of one of the most creative collaborations between a performing artist and photographer in Rock ‘n’ Roll history. Their working partnership resulted in some of the most iconic album art ever conceived –  Bowie’s Aladdin Sane and Lodger.

The Mobile Camera Club Gallery Paris. Slideshow based on the theme of “Community”.

Pleased that my work is showcased alongside many great photographs for the Mobile Camera Club Gallery’s theme ‘Community’. Thx Nad – appreciate my selection. My image was taken at this year’s Bicentenary Battle of Waterloo re-ennactment here in Belgium. It appears at the end and is titled ‘Weekend Warriors’. For more images in the series, please visit my mobile photography site: http://seanmobilephotos.tumblr.com

The Hard Truth Why No One Will Hire You As A Photographer | Fstoppers

Not so sure the advice being offered here is completely new – as an advertising art director with over 30 years of experience, I’ve always been on the lookout to commission photographic talent that transcends the mundane and pedestrian. However, what is new is the tsunami of sameness that now inundates the world of image-making. The sheer volume of visual work being produced, due to the ubiquity of digital technologies, has democratised a once exclusive and expensive club. Today, everybody can be a photographer and everybody is. Daring to be different has never been more relevant in the current creative marketplace. Which is only good news in my book. People will always pay for what is rare. Seeing the world differently and having the guts to pursue that vision is rare. For that, you will always find a market. Good luck. And as Steve Jobs would say, “Think Different”.

 

Link to article: The Hard Truth Why No One Will Hire You As A Photographer | Fstoppers.

I’ll keep this short and sweet. TED2015’s short film festival

I’m a person who has always been interested in interesting people who say or make interesting things. Advertising used to be melting pot of these kind of people. Not so much anymore. I believe the art of short film making is where all the interesting stuff is being conceived and beaten into shape on laptops all around the world – sometimes on a shoestring budget. Historically, the price of producing slick audio-visual projects were prohibitively expensive and only the most dedicated – or maddest, pick your superlative – had the endurance to bring their visions to fruition. Today, thanks to affordable technology, the price of entry to this once exclusive club has dropped to almost zero. The only investment required is a belief in your own ability to make interesting things. That’s the good news. The bad news is you have to make or say something very, very, very interesting to break through the tsunami of sameness that infests our creative culture today. These films, I believe, are a good representation of what can be achieved creatively if one sets out with a good idea to start with – something that resonates with us as empathetic human beings. The film “Reach” by Luke Randall is a good example of storytelling that pulls on heart strings as well as electronic cables. Many people believe that technology is changing us and that we must keep up with technological change if we want to stay relevant. Rubbish. Our human responses to authenticity has always been the same – for countless generations. These films are authentic. That’s why they work so well. Artifice can only get you so far. Creativity about is building things that ring true. Short films used to be a “calling card” while prospecting for bigger projects. I believe they are now a standalone art form in and of themselves. Hope you agree. Enjoy.

TED Blog

Watching more than seventy live, perspective-changing TED Talks back to back for five days straight is nothing to scoff at. Let’s be honest: Your brain gets tired. That’s why TED’s curators program each session with short video breaks to give the mind a rest before the next set of talks. Funny, inspiring, silly, beautiful, here’s all the videos shown this year at the conference. Think of it as TED’s short film festival.

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Pinnipèdes
, by Victor Caire. Two fat, sleepy animated seals fight and love each other.

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Wiggly Things
, by Rogier van der Zwaag. An animated interpretation of philosopher Alan Watts’ lectures, about how we humans like to “break down the wiggliness of the world.”

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Reach
, by Luke Randall. A robot that needs to be plugged in in order to survive dreams of life outside his window.

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Moving images
, by Lorne Resnick. Lorne Resnick makes five-second video clips…

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Photographer Hal vacuum seals couples for condomania ads

Brilliant. I love the way Japanese creatives approach advertising briefs that produce “out-of-the-box” thinking, and – in this case – into vacuum sealed bags. In this age of convoluted ad campaigns of digital drudgery, simple, creative and compelling photography coupled with relevant and witty copy remains a powerful a way of communicating memorable brand ideas. Congratulations to Japanese photographer Hal for helping us preserve the love of simple, yet striking, advertising ideas. For more about Hal and the rest of the campaign executions, please follow the link below:

photographer hal vacuum seals couples for condomania ads.

Things for which I am grateful #32

Again, not exactly within the remit of this blog, but good ideas are always worth sharing. I love advertising ideas that take what is familiar about our world and turn them into the unfamiliar. These kind of ideas grab our attention and makes us re-evaluate our preconceived notions and biases that we all possess: in this particular case; the plight of the homeless. The ‘Big Idea’ in advertising has unfortunately fallen out of favour due to the relentless onslaught from digital marketing platforms that favour the rather ominously titled ‘Big Data’ ; where algorithms, instead of the art of seduction, are employed by advertisers to separate you from your hard-earned cash. More’s the pity. Ideas that have a powerful insight can literally move mountains. The conceptual art director of the above campaign, David Milligan-Croft, came up with an idea that moved hearts. And minds. And ultimately wallets. That takes talent. Talent that is, sadly, hemorrhaging from the business on a daily basis. To be replaced by – robots :-/

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Alas, it is not an idyllic croft by the ocean…

…but, a roof.

Over my head.

And, on days like today, when it’s blowing a howling gale and lashing with rain, it makes one feel all the more grateful.

Apparently, there are about 380,000 people in Britain who don’t have this luxury.

When I lived in Ireland I worked on a guerilla campaign for a homeless charity called Focus Ireland. The idea was based on using the plaques where famous people lived and doctoring them, using real people’s names, and placing them on the streets where homeless people slept rough. The concept being: Everyone has a right to a home.

It was hugely successful in terms of raising money and awareness.

N.B. Plaques in Ireland are brown unlike the blue ones in the UK.

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