Tagged: Cubism

Dangerous Minds | David Hockney’s Cubist photography

Brussels Bistro Belgium

Brussels Bistro © Sean Hayes

The English painter, David Hockney, never liked stills photography. For him, the medium lacked the ability to record the fluidity of time and space and Hockney considered painting and drawing far superior in this regard. This perceived limitation, however, did not stop Hockney from experimenting with Polaroid and SLR 35mm prints to construct elaborate photo collages – referring to them as “Joiners”. Hockney experimented with photography between 1970 and 1986 but became increasingly frustrated with the limitations of the medium and its ‘one-eyed’ approach, as he called it. He subsequently returned to painting, but left an impressive body of photographic work that was well received by the art world at the time. I’ve posted a link to an article about Hockney’s foray into the photographic world because I have always been interested in the overlapping disciplines of photography and painting; having experimented with photo collages recently (see photo above), using a humble iPhone and the AutoStitch photo app to create dynamic images of everyday scenes. I recommend you try to make photo collages as well – they are fun to do and the results can be quite surprising.

Link to article: Dangerous Minds | David Hockney’s Cubist photography.

hockney-furstenberg-paris

Furstenberg Paris © David Hockney

Randoms: Atlantic Storm © Sean Hayes

Atlantic_Storm_Sean_Hayes

Atlantic Storm © Sean Hayes


I shot this image early one morning as a summer storm came in off the Atlantic and slammed into a lonely beach on the west coast of Ireland. The raw power of nature. A treasured memory. Hope you like the image – and should you like one of the images enough to want a pristine print on your wall, please write to me at shonski50@me.com and we’ll chat about print sizes, prices and shipping arrangements. Thank you for your visit

Randoms: Après Cézanne © Sean Hayes

Cézanne painting photography

Après Cézanne © Sean Hayes (2012)

The more I go back over my archived photographic files selecting images for the ‘Randoms’ category, the more I realise that my work is heavily influenced by my love of fine art painting. In particular, the paintings of the French Impressionists from the 1870’s onwards. The Impressionists painted light rather than form. This painterly effect of spontaneity and effortless hid a well-crafted allegiance to carefully constructed composition. Impressionists were condemned by the art establishment at the time for their slapdash approach to painting – being far too vivid in colour and lacking discipline of technique. Paul Cézanne is one painter from this period that I have always admired. Though not strictly an ‘Impressionist’, his early work certainly adhered to the movements philosophy of rendering, in paint, the ‘sensation’ of something rather than its form. Both Matisse and Picasso were in awe of his talent and heavily influenced their early work as they transformed the radical modernism of Impressionism into a more Cubist aesthetic. Hope you like my photographic homage to Cézanne – and should you like the image enough to want a pristine print on your wall, please write to me at shonski50@me.com and we’ll chat about print sizes, prices and shipping arrangements. Thank you for your visit.

Paul Cézanne Painting

The Basket of Apples
1890–1894 by Paul Cézanne