Tagged: London

Fake news? Old News.

 

At a loss to understand why ‘fake news’ is considered ‘new’ news. Everybody has being lying to everybody else since we crawled out of the primordial swamp. To be more precise, believing their own perceptions of reality; packaging and promoting it – for personal gain. This Guardian commercial from a London ad agency in 1986 not only sums up why advertising became a noble profession (through the sheer creativity of simple observation – sadly gone) but also through the fallibility of what people believe and why they believe it. Today’s journos take note. Examine all issues from all angles, then decide. The power of discernment. Thank you for your 3 and half ‘Likes’.

Hi-diddle-dee-dee. A photographer’s life for me.

Really enjoying my new profession as a photographer. Here is a quick selection of some of my favourite shots since taking the leap in June. Many thanks to the people who have also taken a leap of faith and hired me. You know who you are. Thank you. For more of my work, please visit http://seanhayesphotography.format.com

Fanz_****_Vfestival_2016_Sean_Hayes

Festival faces. Vfestival 2016. Hylands Park. Chelmsford. UK © Sean Hayes

 

Faithless_On_Stage_Recco_2016_Sean_Hayes

Maxi Jazz. Lead vocalist of British electronica band Faithless at the 2016 Vfestival, Hylands Park, Chelmsford, UK. Client: Roseanna Burns, Paul Stafford Virgin Media UK © Sean Hayes

 

IMG_0421

Ricky Wilson. Lead vocalist of English indie band Kaiser Chiefs at the 2016 Vfestival, Hylands Park, Chelmsford, UK. Client: Roseanna Burns, Paul Stafford Virgin Media UK © Sean Hayes

 

Mick_Retouched_DSLR_Headphones

Car’n’Stuff Campaign – “iPad Geek” Creative Team: Trista Vincent, Declan Byrne. Agency: RMG Dublin Client: Liberty Insurance Ireland © Sean Hayes

 

(Cropped)_Final_Dylan_Guitar_DSLR_Colour_Difine_1_Eye_Ink_Sean_Hayes

Car’n’Stuff Campaign – “Guitarist” Creative Team: Trista Vincent, Declan Byrne. Agency: RMG Dublin Client: Liberty Insurance Ireland © Sean Hayes

 

Feeling honoured to be among the Honourable Mentions at IPPAWARDS 2016

My new photography website.

Someone, somewhere stated that “Good is the enemy of great”. I’ve been fiddling with my new website for weeks trying to make peace between the two. A truce was called. Time to launch myself into my “second life”. Being an advertising art director for the last 25 years has been incredibly rewarding for me – but my real passion now is photography. When you are passionate about doing something,  you tend to do it well, and it shows in the work. Hopefully, my passion for photography will, in time, shine through. If you get a moment, I would appreciate you visiting the site and rummaging around. Please feel free to suggest ideas and thoughts about the site and how I could make it better. Good enough may be the enemy of great, but the will to get better is your best weapon in the fight to do great work.

Link to site: http://seanhayesphotography.format.com

Screen Shot 2016-07-01 at 09.41.43

New Photography Website.

It’s Nice That | Daragh Soden’s thoughtful portraits of young Dubliners

Film vs Digital – Doubt vs Certainty.

 

British artist Tacita Dean alludes to a quality about film that we have all but forgotten in our digitised world, namely, the artistic necessity of gestation. The immediacy that digital affords the creative process has diminished the value of an ‘interval of time’ between start and finish; where mistakes can be made, flaws are seen and incorporated, and the chemistry allowed to surprise. Digital crushes time by being efficient and economical. Digital leaves nothing to chance by banishing the ‘not knowing’ part of creativity that’s an essential ingredient of image making. Our so-called modern world demands clarity, conviction, conciseness, confidence and cost control – digital delivers all these digital left brain qualities. Ambiguity and doubt are the domain of the analog right brain – and that is where interesting things are made. Nuance.

 

“There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept.” Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams’ famous quote about technical proficiency in photography is more apt today than ever. Camera manufactures and photography ‘gearheads’ continue to peddle a narrow narrative concerning the importance of mathematically machined photographic equipment and its importance if you want to ‘shoot like a pro’. British photographer Pennie Smith has proven otherwise. Her iconic photo of Paul Simonon smashing his guitar on stage during a show in New York City in 1979 is a perfect example of the visceral power of an imperfect photograph that is perfectly flawed. It’s out of focus and grainy. A technocrats worst nightmare. Yet it became one of the most famous images in Rock’n’Roll when used as cover art for The Clash’s London Calling album. A fuzzy photo that captures the energy and vitality of life will always win out against a sterile photo that’s perfectly sharp.

pennie_smith_the-clash1

London Calling Album Cover © Pennie Smith

Interview with Pennie Smith via Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/showstudio-official/showstudio-punk-photography-4

Nadav Kander shoots simple but powerful new Samaritans campaign – Creative Review

I’ve always admired the work of Nadav Kander. The simple elegance  of his advertising and editorial photography belies the consideration and intelligence he puts into creating some of the most compelling images in photography today. Couple his renowned photographic skills with equally considered and intelligent advertising copywriting and art direction and something interesting – and increasingly rare – happens: Your advertising gets noticed. Result. Simples. To quote recently retired adman Bob Hoffman of http://adcontrarian.blogspot.be fame; “Creative people make the ads. Everyone else makes the arrangements.”

Link to Kander’s site: http://www.nadavkander.com

Source: Nadav Kander shoots simple but powerful new Samaritans campaign – Creative Review

Movie Extra Portrait Series © Sean Hayes

This week I was working as an ‘extra’ on the Jonathan Barré film ‘La folle histoire de Max et Léon. Some of the filming is taking place in the Belgium city of Namur, and is the humorous story of two French orphans during WW2. As per usual, I decided to make a pest of myself in between takes and asked if I could photograph the portraits of some of the supporting cast and ‘extras’. Here are the results. I shot everything with the LGG4 smartphone using available light. I processed the images with the Snapseed and Picfx photo apps.

If you would like to see more of my mobile photography portraits, please visit : http://seanmobileportraits.tumblr.com

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

IN-CAMERA 1: Interview with Brian Griffin. Master of advertising photography.

Cover art for Depeche Mode’s 1982 album ‘A Broken Frame’. Photography by Brian Griffin.

I remember being in awe of this photograph when I first saw it back in the early 80s. So simple. So graphic. But also so painterly in its treatment of light and composition. I was a junior pencil-sharpner in a Dublin ad agency at the time and realised great conceptual ad work was being produced in tandem with beautifully crafted images by photographers like Brian Griffin in the UK. So I left for Paris:) And the rest is geography. (line pinched from copy king Peter Russell). Check out Griffin’s masterful photographic work that helped make the London ad scene a powerhouse of advertising creativity right through the 70s, 80s and 90s. Thanks to David Dye for posting this interview on his blog and reminding me why I wanted to work in advertising in the first place. It really was an incredibly creative and innovative time to be in the business. I miss it. Link to interview: IN-CAMERA 1: Brian Griffin..