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It’s been a busy couple of months since I launched myself as a professional photographer in June. Some really nice briefs have been coming my way. Keep them coming:) If you get a moment, maybe you could visit my online portfolio and have a browse around to see if there’s anything that catches your eye. Let’s make beautiful pictures together. http://seanhayesphotography.format.com

This week I was working as an ‘extra’ on the Jonathan Barré film ‘La folle histoire de Max et Léon. Some of the filming is taking place in the Belgium city of Namur, and is the humorous story of two French orphans during WW2. As per usual, I decided to make a pest of myself in between takes and asked if I could photograph the portraits of some of the supporting cast and ‘extras’. Here are the results. I shot everything with the LGG4 smartphone using available light. I processed the images with the Snapseed and Picfx photo apps.

If you would like to see more of my mobile photography portraits, please visit : http://seanmobileportraits.tumblr.com

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Movie Extra Series © Sean Hayes

Ida. Cinematographer Lukasz Zal.

Ida. Cinematographer Lukasz Zal.

I’ve tagged this compelling post under the title of Cinematography, which is, admittedly, stretching the remit of my blog a bit, but an article from today’s British Guardian merits attention. Although two of the films mentioned – “Ida” and “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter… and Spring” – are beyond sublime cinematographically and deserve more than a mere footnote, the real reason I’ve reposted is to share the central premise of the article: Movies matter. We live in an age where most of our cultural gatekeepers have been demoted by a digital democracy championing an understanding that everything is now commodity: A sense that it doesn’t matter what you make so long as it satisfies a market need or want. This is unfortunate. The best movies, like the best art, usually come out of left field – uninvited and unexpected. The market is like a two-way mirror. The market is never surprised. It only observes. It consumes – never creates. Great movies, on the other hand, are always mirrors of who we are inside. The movies mentioned in the article are great movies. Worth a read. Link to article:  I watch therefore I am: seven movies that teach us key philosophy lessons | Film | The Guardian.

I’m a person who has always been interested in interesting people who say or make interesting things. Advertising used to be melting pot of these kind of people. Not so much anymore. I believe the art of short film making is where all the interesting stuff is being conceived and beaten into shape on laptops all around the world – sometimes on a shoestring budget. Historically, the price of producing slick audio-visual projects were prohibitively expensive and only the most dedicated – or maddest, pick your superlative – had the endurance to bring their visions to fruition. Today, thanks to affordable technology, the price of entry to this once exclusive club has dropped to almost zero. The only investment required is a belief in your own ability to make interesting things. That’s the good news. The bad news is you have to make or say something very, very, very interesting to break through the tsunami of sameness that infests our creative culture today. These films, I believe, are a good representation of what can be achieved creatively if one sets out with a good idea to start with – something that resonates with us as empathetic human beings. The film “Reach” by Luke Randall is a good example of storytelling that pulls on heart strings as well as electronic cables. Many people believe that technology is changing us and that we must keep up with technological change if we want to stay relevant. Rubbish. Our human responses to authenticity has always been the same – for countless generations. These films are authentic. That’s why they work so well. Artifice can only get you so far. Creativity about is building things that ring true. Short films used to be a “calling card” while prospecting for bigger projects. I believe they are now a standalone art form in and of themselves. Hope you agree. Enjoy.

TED Blog

Watching more than seventy live, perspective-changing TED Talks back to back for five days straight is nothing to scoff at. Let’s be honest: Your brain gets tired. That’s why TED’s curators program each session with short video breaks to give the mind a rest before the next set of talks. Funny, inspiring, silly, beautiful, here’s all the videos shown this year at the conference. Think of it as TED’s short film festival.

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Pinnipèdes
, by Victor Caire. Two fat, sleepy animated seals fight and love each other.

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Wiggly Things
, by Rogier van der Zwaag. An animated interpretation of philosopher Alan Watts’ lectures, about how we humans like to “break down the wiggliness of the world.”

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Reach
, by Luke Randall. A robot that needs to be plugged in in order to survive dreams of life outside his window.

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Moving images
, by Lorne Resnick. Lorne Resnick makes five-second video clips…

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Link to site: http://seanmobileportraits.tumblr.com

Choreographer © Sean Hayes

Choreographer © Sean Hayes

How an editor destroyed the meaning of Kubrick’s movies by turning them into summer blockbusters.

Link to article: The Shining and Other Complex Stanley Kubrick Films Recut as Simple Hollywood Movies | Open Culture.

Raquel Welch on the cross, Los Angeles 1970 © Terry O'Neill

Raquel Welch on the cross, Los Angeles 1970 © Terry O’Neill

If you don’t know who Terry O’Neill is – shame on you. One of the most influential and successful photographers of modern times, O’Neill’s iconic work of 60’s and 70’s movie and rock royalty has guaranteed his place in the photographic hall of fame. This clip is a very relaxed and anecdotal review of his life and loves. Worth 50 minutes of your time.

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