Tagged: Visual arts

Wet Dogs © Sophie Gamand

wetdog11

wetdog series © Sophie Gamand

Does anybody look their best after a shower?  I will never understand why dog/cat food manufacturers and their creative agencies rarely explore campaigns that recognise the ‘laugh out loud’ fun of being a pet owner. Pets are hilarious. Marketing mangers less so. Click on the link for some more canine indignity.

Link: Funny Portraits of Wet Dogs by Sophie Gamand – My Modern Metropolis.

Pixel Paintings Series © Sean Hayes (2013)

Dublin Ireland

Dublin Bay © Sean Hayes (2013)

Killiney Bay Ireland

KIlliney Bay © Sean Hayes (2013)

Knokke Belgium

Knokke © Sean Hayes (2013)

Thanks to digital, we now live in a picture perfect world. Perfectly polished pixels that only a computer could make and love; but we are not algorithmic machines – perfect is boring. I’ve always been a big fan of the imperfections of painting. The yellowing varnish, the hairline cracks, and the tarnish of time all add to the art and aesthetic of the painting. I originally shot the above images on my DSLR. They looked good enough – but lacked intrigue. A bit too picture postcard. I uploaded them to my iPhone and applied textures using photo apps to give them a more ‘painterly’ personality. Hope you like the series of images – and should you like one of the images enough to want a pristine print on your wall, please write to me at shonski50@me.com and we’ll chat about print sizes, prices and shipping arrangements. Thank you for your visit.

Negative Space Series © Sean Hayes (2013)

Negative Space

Negative Space Series © Sean Hayes (2013)

Negative Space

Negative Space Series © Sean Hayes (2013)

Negative Space

Negative Space Series © Sean Hayes (2013)

I work in an industry were most people are terrified of empty space. Advertising clients invariably abhor blank areas in their ads – perceiving it as a ‘waste of money’. The Japanese have a much more enlightened approach, calling the intervals between things “Ma”. The principle is analogous to music – with the absence of pauses and spaces between notes, there would be no melody – no music – only confusion and discord. Same principle applies to the visual arts. Space is never a waste, it is the rhythm for the eye which guides and helps the viewer perceive coherently what the creator had in mind. Empty space has meaning. It defines and frames substance so that we can understand what we are looking at. The above series of images are heavily influenced by the monochrome Japanese painting style developed by the great Zen Monasteries of the 14th century. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasegawa_Tōhaku  Hope you like them – and should you like one of them enough to want a pristine print on your wall, please write to me at shonski50@me.com and we’ll chat about print sizes, prices and shipping arrangements. Thank you for your visit.